The PCI Network – Compliance, Suspension and Debarment

This episode of The PCI Network focuses on Suspension and Debarment. David Drabkin, Director and Faculty at PCI discusses, how to maintain compliance and avoid suspension and debarment. Mr. Drabkin is currently the Director of Acquisition Policy with Northrop Grumman Corporation. There he works with Congress, Executive Agencies and Industry Associations to evaluate and promulgate acquisition policy for Federal programs ensuring the interests of the Northrop Grumman are represented in the process.

The PCI Network – Character Traits for a Great Government Contracts Professional

In this episode of The PCI Network, the head of our FUN with the FAR series, Stephen Daoust, discusses the four traits of a great government contracts professional. Throughout his 25-year career, Steve has worked as a Chief Government Contracts Counsel, Director of Contracts, and Chief Compliance Officer for both publicly traded companies like Iridium and Affiliated Computer Services and large accounting firms like PricewaterhouseCoopers, where he was asked on a daily basis to provide expert advice and counsel on the negotiation and administration of contracts with federal, state, and local Governments. Check out what he has to say below!

The PCI Network – Ethics in Government Contracting

Understanding the difference between right and wrong isn’t always as easy as you may think. In the Federal Contracting industry, there are important ethical distinctions that can create confusion if you don’t know where to look. Join Fred Geldon, a PCI Director and Faculty, as he explains the importance of ethics in Government Contracting and how to minimize the confusion.

Myth No. 2: We Should Always Protest.

*This post is the second in the ten part series, “Ten Myths of Government Contracting” and will be released weekly. Each week will introduce  a new myth and run for ten weeks.  The decision to file a protest highlights one of the unique features of contracting with the U.S. Government, involving as it does a long list of questions that must be addressed and the pressure of having to decide whether to sue a customer within a very short time frame. In Myth No. 1, “We should never protest,” I explained why there might be certain situations where a company really should protest.  As in other walks of life, however, a company’s reputation is an important part of its success, and its reputation could be … Continue reading

Ten Myths of Government Contracting: Myth No. 1: We Should Never Protest

*This post is the first in the ten part series, “Ten Myths of Government Contracting” and will be released weekly. Each week will introduce  a new myth and run for ten weeks.    Myth No. 1:  We should never protest.   Bid protests are an intimidating aspect of Government contracting, not only because they usually mean hiring a lawyer, but also because most people don’t even like the thought of suing their customer.  Protests certainly are not part of the commercial business sector, but they are a daily occurrence in Government contracting, and anyone jumping into this business needs to understand how protests work and the role they play. Most protests relating to a U.S. Government procurement may be filed in three separate places—with the … Continue reading

The Government’s Duty of Good Faith and Fair Dealing

The long-standing principle that the federal government had the same implied duty of good faith and fair dealing as any commercial buyer was put in jeopardy by a 2010 decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, Precision Pine & Timber, Inc. v. U.S., 596 F.3d 817 (Fed. Cir. 2010). There a panel of the court adopted a narrow rule seemingly limiting application of the principle to situations where a government action was “specifically targeted” at the contractor or had the effect of taking away one of the benefits that had been promised to the contractor. Although the decision concerned a timber sales contract not a procurement contract, when I wrote it up in the May 2010 Nash & Cibinic Report (24 … Continue reading